Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


VIRGINIA TECH
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Literary Chronicle
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Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
172LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
1

  Tannahill, Robert, [note] author of “Jessie the Flower of Dumblane,” and several other popular love
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.173
ditties, which entitle him to rank with the very best song writers in our language, not even excepting
Burns, was born at Paisley, on the 3rd of June, 1774. His parents were poor, and unable to give him more than the most ordinary school education. At an early age he was bound apprentice to a weaver, and followed that occupation till his death. As soon as he became known for the possession of poetical talents, his acquaintance was courted by many who were much his superiors in station; but nothing was ever done to raise him above the obscurity and hardship of his original condition. A collection of his pieces was published at Paisley, and such profit as may have accrued to him from its sale, was all the reward ever conferred on a bard whose strains were soon on every tongue. The neglect of the world appears to have weighed heavily on a mind naturally of strong sensibility; and, producing a hopelessness of ever emancipating himself from circumstances so ill suited to his genius, ended in a confirmed melancholy. While in this low situation, he received a visit from the celebrated Mountain Bard, Mr. Hogg, [note] who had made a long pilgrimage to see and converse with one who, like himself, was a child of poverty and song. After a night spent in the most delightful communion of sentiment, Mr. Hogg took his departure, and Tannahill accompanied him half the way to Glasgow. The parting was mournful: “Farewell!” said Tannahill, “we shall never meet again.” The words were prophetic; the heart-struck bard had already taken that resolve which was too surely to bring about their accomplishment.
174LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
Poor Tannahill was not long after found drowned. He had reached the thirty-sixth year of his age. His remains lie buried in his native town.