Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Literary Chronicle
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Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.167
1

  Skinner, the Rev. John, [note] titular bishop of the Episcopalian persuasion, was the author of Tullochgorum, John o' Badenyon, and several other highly popular songs. In a letter to Burns, dated 14th November, 1787, he says,

168LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
2

“A small portion of taste this way I have had almost from childhood, especially in the old Scottish dialect; and it is as old a thing as I remember, my fondness for Christ's Kirk o' the Green, [note] which I had by heart ere I was twelve years of age, and which, some years ago, I attempted to turn into Latin verse. While I was young I dabbled a good deal in these things; but, on getting on the black gown, I gave it pretty much over, till my daughters grew up, who, being all good singers, plagued me for words to some of their favourite tunes, and so extorted those effusions, which have made a public appearance beyond my expectations and contrary to my intentions; at the same time, that I hope there is nothing to be found in them uncharacteristic or unbecoming the cloth, which I would always wish to see respected.”

3

Mr. Skinner's translation of Christ's Kirk on the Green may be found in a collection, entitled, “Carminum Rariorum Macaronicorum Delectus, Fasciculus Primus.” Edin. 1801. Dr. Irving [note] says of it, “The genuine humour of the original is by no means transfused into this version. King James presents us with a succession of highly ludicrous objects, and never fails to mark them with the characteristic lines of his bold pencil, but Skinner has often contented himself with general representation of the sense, and has suffered those arch peculiarities of manner to elude his grasp.” Mr. Skinner wrote also a Latin version of Ramsay's tale of the Monk and the Miller's Wife, and Batrachomyomachia Homeri, Latinis vestita cum additamentis. But in neither of these classical vagaries was be more suc-
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.169
cessful than in his translation of
Christ's Kirk on the Green.