Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Documents:
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Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
166LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
1

  Sempil, Francis, [note] son of the last Robert Sempil, was an adherent of the Stuart family. He wrote several panegyrics on James II., while Duke of York and Albany, and on the birth of his children; also satires upon the Whigs, some of which still remain in MS. He was the author likewise of a piece of considerable merit, entitled, “The Banishment of Poverty,” and of a well-known song, “She rose and let me in.” Stat. Account. [note]

2

A grandson of this Francis Sempil, called Robert, deserves to be incidentally mentioned as a remarkable instance of longevity. He died in 1789, at the age of one hundred and eight. He was the first in the nomination of justices of peace for Scotland, in 1708, being the year after the Union. Towards the close of life his memory gradually failed him, but two incidents of his early days remained impressed on his mind after all others appeared effaced. The first was, his being present while the witches were burnt at Paisley, in 1697, the last detestable exhibition of that kind in Scotland. The second was, his having seen Peter the Great, at Archangel, amusing himself with some sea animals in a pond, when one of them snapped at him and bit the cock off his hat. This last occurrence he continued to repeat to the day of his death, after he had forgotten every other.