Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Documents:
Advertisement
Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
160LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
1

  Ross, Dr. Alexander. [note]

“There was an ancient sage philosopher
That had read Alexander Ross over;
And swore the world, as he could prove,
Was made of fighting and of love.”
2

Dr. Ross, whose name these sarcastic lines of Butler [note] have, perhaps, done more to preserve, than the work itself (View of all Religions) which suggested them, though it passed through many editions, and was translated into many languages, was one of the most voluminous writers of the seventeenth century; and among his works these in poetry occupy a prominent place. Sir William Urquhart styles him “a must learned and worthy gentleman, and most endeared minion of the Muses, who hath written manye excellent books in Latin and English, what in prose, what in verse, than he hath lived years.” The “Virgilius Evangelisans of Dr. Alexander Ross,” says Dr. Irving, [note] “possesses
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.161
much merit as a cento.” It is a picture of the life of Christ, in language collected entirely from Virgil. [note] Grainger, [note] too, says, that it is ingenious and was deservedly admired. Of his Mel Heliconium, see an account by Mr. Park [note] in his Censura Literaria.