Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Literary Chronicle
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Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.155
1

  Pitcairne, Archibald, M.D. [note] After the death of this celebrated physician, Ruddiman [note] published a small volume entitled, “Selecta Poëmata Archibaldi Pitcairnii et aliorum, &c.” The publication was intended to refute a remark of Peter Burman, [note] in his preface to his edition of Buchanan's History, that the Latin Muses appeared to have deserted Scotland. “But,” says Lord Woodhouselee, [note] “the very attempt affords a demonstration of the truth of the proposition it was meant to disprove, for the poems of Pitcairne comprise almost all that
156LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
are of any merit in the volume; and even these, from the nature of their subjects,—temporary political satire, (against the Revolution,) the commemoration of local incidents, or allusions to private characters,—have none of the requisites to found either a general or a permanent reputation.”— Dr. Pitcairne wrote also a comedy called “The Assembly,” which was printed at London, in 1722. Mr. G. Chalmers [note] says it is “personal and political, sarcastic and prophane, and never could have been acted on any stage.” A pleasing specimen of his poetical powers occurs in Donaldson's [note] collection, but is there said to be the work of “Walter Denestone,” a nom-de-guerre which Dr. P. was in the habit of using. It is entitled— “Μορμον Σιολιμος, sive Lamiarum Vestestus; a poem on the king and queen of Fairy.” It is in two versions, Latin and English, and is in the following pleasing and fanciful strain.

No sooner was their King attyr'd,
As never Prince had been,
But, as in duty was requir'd,
They next array their Queen.
Of shining thread shut from the sun,
And twisted into line,
On the light wheel of fortune spun,
Was made her smock so fine.
Her gown was very colour'd fair;
The rainbow gave the dip;
Perfumed by an amber air,
Breath'd from a Virgin's lip, &c.