Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Documents:
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Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.171
1

  Stormont, David, [note] second Viscount, inherited his father's elegiac taste, and has established rather a better claim to a place in the “Catalogue of royal and noble Authors,” by a poem of some length, “On the Death of Frederick Prince of Wales.” It was published in the “Union, or Select Scots and English Poems,” published at Edinburgh 1753; but appears to have escaped the notice of Mr. Park, [note] the able continuator of Lord Orford's [note] work. We learn from the poem that it was composed in France and from an invocation of “Wolsey's spacious Dome,” that its author was of Christ Church Oxford. It is written with considerable taste, but in blank verse, not so well paced as could have been wished. The opening lines bespeak attention by their sweetness and modesty.

Little I whilom deem'd my artless zeal
Should woo the British Muse in Foreign land,
To strains of bitter argument, and teach
The mimic nymph, that haunts the winding verge,
And oozy current of Parisian Seine,
To syllable new sounds in accents strange.
But sad occasion calls: Who now forbears
The last kind office? Who but consecrates
His off'ring at the shrine of fair renown,
To gracious Frederick
[note] rais'd; tho' but compos'd
Of the waste flow'rets, whose neglected hues
Chequer the lonely hedge or mountain slope?”