Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Literary Chronicle
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Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
150LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
1

  Montrose, (James Graham,) Marquis of, [note] so celebrated for his martial exploits, was also a favourite of the Muses. Watson, [note] in his Collection, [note] has published eight short amatory pieces, written by his lordship; in one of which, “I'll never love thee more,” his attachment to monarchy is, by way of allegory, very fancifully exemplified.
“And in the empire of thy heart,
Where I should solely be,
If others do pretend a part,
Or dare to share with me,
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.151
Or committees if thou erect,
Or go on such a score,
I'll smiling mock at thy neglect,
And never love thee more.” &c.
Another piece, equally characteristic of this heroic chief, is his celebrated effusion on the death of Charles the First.
[note]
“Great! good! and just! could I but rate
My griefs, and thy too rigid fate,
I'd weep the world to such a strain
As it should deluge once again.
But since thy loud-tongu'd blood demands supply
More from Briareus' hands than Argus' eye,
I'll sing thy obsequies with trumpets' sounds,
And write thy epitaph with blood and wounds.
Montrose.”
Written with the point of his sword.
On hearing the terms of the cruel sentence, which was passed upon him for his adherence to the royal cause, he thus gave vent to his feelings:
“Let them bestow on every earth a limb,
And open all my veins, that I may swim
To thee, my Saviour, in that crimson lake;
Then place my parboil'd head upon a stake;
Scatter my ashes, throw them in the air:—
Lord, since thou know'st where all those atoms are,
I'm hopeful, once thou'lt re-collect my dust;
And confident, thou'lt raise use with the just.”
In the catalogue of the British Museum, there is a tract entitled, “De Rebus præeclare ab eo gestis,” 1647, 8vo., which is ascribed to his lordship.