Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


VIRGINIA TECH
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Documents:
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Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
RICHARD LORD MAITLAND
8LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
RICHARD LORD MAITLAND.

1

Richard Lord Maitland [note] was the eldest son of Charles third Earl of Lauderdale, who succeeded his brother, John, the second Earl and first Duke of Lauderdale, [note] in 1682. The dukedom having been restricted to the heirs male of John, became extinct at his death. Richard stood high in the favour of his uncle the duke, an through his interest was admitted, when very young, to a seat in the Privy Council of Scotland, and afterwards raised to the dignified situation of Lord Justice Clerk (1681.) In 1691 he succeeded his father, Charles, in the title of Earl of Lauderdale. Partaking of the hereditary attachment of his family to the House of Stuart, he afterwards followed James II. [note] to France, and died in exile.

2

While Lord Maitland, he wrote a translation of Virgil, which was a long time handed about in manuscript, and not published till after Dryden, [note] as Pope [note] thinks, had left no room for competition. Speaking of Dryden's translation of some parts of Homer, [note] Pope says, “Had he translated the whole work, I would no more have attempted Homer after him than Virgil; his version of whom, notwithstanding some human errors, is the most noble and spirited translation I know in any language.” Dryden had, besides, seen Lord Maitland's version in its manuscript state, and had stripped it of not a few of its beauties, for the
POETS — RICHARD LORD MAITLAND.9
embellishment of his own translation. Many whole lines in Dryden's Virgil have been literally borrowed from Lord Maitland. Dr. Trapp [note] says of Lord Maitland's version, that “it is pretty near the original, not so close as its brevity would make one, imagine.”

T. M.