Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


VIRGINIA TECH
*    *    *    *    *
HOME
CONTENTS
PERSON INDEX
TITLE INDEX

Documents:
Advertisement
Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
LORD BINNING
POETS — LORD BINNING.15
LORD BINNING.

1

Charles Hamilton, Lord Binning, [note] was the eldest son and heir apparent of Thomas, the sixth Earl of Haddington. He gave early promise of being an ornament to his country, but, being of a tender constitution, fell into a lingering decay. With the hope of deriving benefit from a change of climate, he went to Naples, where he died in 1732, during the life-time of his father. To a fine understanding and cultivated taste, his lordship joined a frankness and generosity of disposition, which made him as beloved as he was admired. He possessed, like his father, a turn for poetry, but of a purer sort; and was the author of a pastoral effusion, not unknown to the lovers of ballad poetry, called “Ungrateful Nanny.” It appeared originally in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1741, and has been re-published by Ritson. [note] It is but a string of conceits, yet they are such conceits as please; for example:

My cheeks are swell'd with tears, but she
Has never shed a tear for me.
*    *    *    *    *
I always thought on her, but she
Would ne'er bestow one thought on me:
16LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
If no relief to me she'll bring,
I'll hang me in her apron string.
2

His lordship is also the reputed author of another ballad of a colloquial kind, and of no great merit, titled “The Duke of Argyle's Levee,” published the Gentleman's Magazine for February, 1740; but the ballad itself seems rather to negative his lordship's pretensions. The narrative is in the first person:

I waited on Argyle, [note]
Than whom no better patriot breathes, &c.
3

And the relater thus afterwards introduces his own name:

His grace then turn'd to me
Ah, Charters!
4

It is not impossible, indeed, that Lord Binning may have palmed the thing upon Charters, who appears, from a note appended to the ballad, to have been a “Colonel Charters.”

R. C.