Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Documents:
Advertisement
Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.121
1

  Douglas, Francis, [note] was bred to the business of a baker, came to London, and while working there as a journeyman, (about 1741), wrote “Rural Love, a tale, in the Scottish dialect;” but did not venture to publish it. He afterwards returned to Scotland; turned printer and bookseller, at Aberdeen; and, in 1759, produced his poetical essay, which could now boast of having had twice the benefit of the Horatian precept; for it had lain fully eighteen years in his hands. A modest advertisement was prefixed, in which the author apologizes for publishing the poem, by saying, “He thinks it contains nothing indecent or immoral; and if, in common with many others, it be found dull, let it be also considered, that it is short.” The piece is one which would not have discredited much higher pretensions. In the first lines, we recognize the hand of no mere poetaster.

When merry Charles [note] the sceptre sway'd,
And none through force or fear obey'd,
There liv'd a man in Watercairn,
A widower, with ae lass bairn:
Twa hunder marks he had to gie her,
Brought men and lads, a fouth to see her. &c.
2

In 1778, Mr. Douglas published another poem, not so good, called “The Birth Day.” When the
122LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
celebrated Douglas cause occupied the public attention, he wrote a spirited pamphlet, in support of The Douglas,
[note] which gained him the favour of that nobleman; who granted him an advantageous lease of a farm at Inchinan Bridge, near Paisley, where he spent the remainder of his days. Besides the works which have been mentioned, he was the author of a “Description of the East Coast of Scotland,” 12mo. and some metaphysical tracts.