Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


VIRGINIA TECH
*    *    *    *    *
HOME
CONTENTS
PERSON INDEX
TITLE INDEX

Documents:
Advertisement
Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.117
1

  Crichton, [note] the admirable. Among the accomplishments, ascribed to this extraordinary character, poetry held a foremost place. His celebrated challenge to the learned of Paris bore that he would dispute, either in prose or verse, at the discretion of his antagonist. When at Venice he wrote several poems in commendation of that city, and its institutions. Going afterwards to Padua, there was a meeting of all the learned men of the place, at the house of one Cornelius, when Crichton opened the assembly with an extemporary poem. When detraction began to be busy with his fame, and it was necessary to confound for ever the invidious impugners of his talents, he offered, among other things, to dispute in any one of a hundred sorts
118LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
of verses! The Duke of Mantua, having made choice of him to be preceptor to his son, Vincentio de Gonzaga, Crichton, to testify his gratitude and contribute to the entertainment of the court of Mantua, composed a comedy, which we are assured was one of the most ingenious satires ever written upon mankind, and sustained himself no less than fifteen characters in the representation of the play. “In short,” says Joannes Imperialis, [note] “he was the wonder of the age, a prodigy of nature, and beyond all past or present example, the glory and ornament of Parnassus!” How much, or how little of all this, to believe, it would be vain to attempt to determine. The whole of Crichton's history rests on such questionable authority, and is so surcharged with exaggeration and falsehood, that truth knows not where to point her finger. To all who reflect dispassionately on the subject, it will probably seem less hard to believe, that it is in human power to do all that has been ascribed to Crichton, than to suppose it possible that such marvellous achievements could actually have been performed, and the eyes of all the world be so fixed upon them, and yet no memorial remain to convince posterity of their reality.

2

Some Latin pieces by Crichton are preserved in the Del. Poet. Scot. [note] but they are not even among the best in the Collection.