Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Documents:
Advertisement
Literary Chronicle
New Monthly Magazine
Monthly Review
Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.101
1

  Barclay, John, [note] minister at Cruden, wrote in 1679, and published in 1689, “A Description (in verse) of the Roman Catholic Church; wherein the pretensions of its head, the manners of his court principles and doctrines, the worship and service the religious houses, and the divers designs and practices of that church, are represented in a vision.” It is a smart satire on the practices the Romish church; and, though it seldom approximates to poetry, the good sense and vigorous expression displayed in many passages, almost compensate for its absence. What, for example can be more just than the following reflection on the affectation so common to men of recluse habits of despising the vanities of the world?

'Tis easy when a man's in solitude
To slight the gawdy world, and to conclude
That all its pomp and riches are but lies,
A heap of gilden worthless vanities;
And to contemnn the fiatt'ring breath of fame,
The foolish whistlings of an honour'd name;
And hate that wild ambition, which, with force,
Doth ride and spur us like unruly horse;
And those imperious lusts, which often cause
Men break all bonds, and trample on all laws;
But things we at a distance can despise,
When they approach us, do bewitch our eyes
And charm our hearts: so strong's the snare,
So weak our mind, so faint our care,
So soon our resolutions do impair,
That were entangled ere we are aware.
2

Among many merry conceits which the work contains, there is one about the use of extreme unction, which would have done honour to the pen of
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.103
Butler.
[note] After a glowing description of the torments of purgatory, the author proceeds;

He then began the poor moan to anoint,
Besmear'd his head, and oiled every joint;
He oil'd his ears, he oil'd his eyes,
He oil'd his hands, he oil'd his thighs;
I thought it would be far from my desire
First to be flam'd,* and then set to the fire.

* The Scotch expression for basted.