Lives of
Scottish Poets
edited by
DAVID HILL RADCLIFFE

Center for Applied Technologies
in the Humanities


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Literary Chronicle
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Notes and Queries
Gibson and Laing
Halkett and Laing
Scottish Notes & Queries

Part I. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the First
Thomas the Rhymer
John Barbour
Andrew Wyntoun
Gavin Douglas
Allan Ramsay
William Meston
John Home
James Beattie
Robert Burns

Part II. (Volume I.)
Front-matter
James the Fifth
William Dunbar
Sir James Inglis
Henry the Minstrel
Sir David Lyndsay
Alexander Barclay
Alexander Montgomerie
William Alexander
William Drummond
James Thomson
John Oswald

Part III. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
James the Sixth
Sir Richard Maitland
Arthur Johnston
Hamilton of Bangour
Hamilton of Gilbertfield
Samuel Colvil
Alexander Ross
John Armstrong
John Ogilvie
James Macpherson
Charles Salmon

Part IV. (Volume II.)
Front-matter
Alexander Hume
John Bellenden
Mark Alexander Boyd
Ninian Paterson
William Wilkie
Robert Fergusson
William Julius Mickle
Alexander Geddes
James Grahame

Part V. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Henryson
Alexander Scott
Walter Kennedy
John Ogilby
Alexander Pennecuik
Alexander Cunningham
David Mallet
William Falconer
Francis Garden
Robert Blair
James Moor
James Graeme
Caleb Whitefoord
James Grainger
Hector Macneill
John Wilson

Part VI. (Volume III.)
Front-matter
Robert Kerr
Richard Lord Maitland
Thomas Hamilton
Charles Hamilton
Michael Bruce
Thomas Blacklock
John Logan
Andrew Macdonald
James Mercer

Appendix. (Volume III.)
James I
Allan Ramsay
John Home
Robert Burns
William Drummond
Robert Fergusson
Alexander Scott
John Wilson
Index
Corrections

Part  VI:
Supplement
94LIVES OF EMINENT SCOTSMEN.
1

  Arbuthnot, Alexander, [note] principal of King's College, Aberdeen, and an active promoter of the reformation, was, according to Bishop Spottiswood, [note] “a good poet.” In Mr. Pinkerton's collection, [note] there are three poems by an “Alexander Arbuthnot,” which Dr. Irving [note] is inclined to ascribe to the principal. Their titles are, “The praises of Women,” “On Luve,” and “The Miseries of a Pure Scholar.” The first two do credit to his gallantry, but the last is by far the best, and as Mr. Pinkerton remarks, does indeed “great honour to the heart and head of its author.” The lines “On Luve,” though not so favourable a specimen, tempt quotation by their brevity.

He that loves lichtiiest
Sall not happen on the best;
He that luves langest
Sall have rest surest;
He that luves all his best
Sall chance upon the godliest;
Qhua sa in luve is true an plaine,
He sall be luvit weel agane;
Men may say quhatever they pleis
In mutual love is mickle eis.
2

  Mr. Pinkerton, in his “Account of the Contents of the two Maitland Manuscripts,” has the following notices of some other pieces by Arbuthnot, in that
POETS — SUPPLEMENT.95
collection, which have not been thought worthy of publication.

3

“31. A religious poem of six pages long, by the same; very dull. Begins ‘Religion now is rakinit ane fabil,’ and is in the same stanza with ‘ The Miseries of a Pure Scholar.

4

“174. ‘ Cese hairt, ’ a pious piece by Arbuthnot.

5

“44. (Quarto MS.) A piece of no value by Arbuthnot, beginning,

‘Gif it be true that storeis dois rehers.’”